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Social Media

Pidgeon Social / Social Media (Page 2)

Social is The Great Online Party. Don’t be Larry.

Have you ever met that super-creepy guy at a party who splits his time between talking about how amazing he is or making lewd comments to anything that moves and breathes? It's pretty obvious in 2 seconds that he doesn't care about anybody else and he's just there to "score". Let's call him Larry (had to pick a name - my apologies to any Larry's out there). Nobody wants to be Larry. People try and avoid Larry at all costs. Yet it seems that most businesses approach social media - AKA The Great Online Party - EXACTLY that creepy, self-serving way. Every post is them trying to "score" with customers. HUGE DEALS. MY PRODUCTS ARE AMAZING. I'M YOUR TRUSTED ADVISOR. I'VE GOT A DEAL FOR YOU. LOOK AT ME, LOOK AT ME, LOOK AT ME. This is what happens when businesses get in in their heads that social media is just another channel to sell their wares on. It's not. So stop it. Social media is simply the name for what we do whenever we have a spare moment. We pickup our phones or pop open a web browser and start looking for a quick hit (or, if you're a parent of young kids and have to "go", the longest hit possible) of entertainment, attention, or connection. For a lot of us, it's more than just distraction - it's an outlet for creativity, an avenue for learning, a place to socialize, or even a spot for doing some good in this world. It's not just an app on our phones - it is a big part of the way we connect in our lives. And here in the midst it, we've got Larry poking his head around the corner of every room in the house shouting, "Hey, ladies, I've got a 40 of Jägermeister and 2 free tickets to the hockey game if you'll just Like and Share." Sure, in that moment, there probably are some people that wouldn't mind the 6-pack or the free tickets so they agree to hang out. But most other people are like, "Excuse me, weird dude, shut up - we're trying to carry on a conversation." And even the people that do agree to hang out with Larry, they aren't in it because they like the guy at all - they just wanted his free stuff. While they may talk about the drinks or the game, they're certainly doing their best to leave him out of the story. Contrast that with Greg. You probably didn't notice him immediately. But...

The Easiest Way to Know if Your Facebook Page is Actually Doing Well

Facebook. It's kinda a big deal. Almost 2 Billion users. 22 million in Canada. 690,000 in Saskatchewan 170,000 in the Regina area. That's about 75% of our city on Facebook. Granted, they're not all going to be active, but A LOT of them are. Not only are they "active", but they spend A LOT of time on Facebook. (Canadians spend more time online than anyone else...

How to be a decent human being on Snapchat

Snapchat is definitely my favourite social network right now. I love it because it's real, authentic stories are way better than the highly-emotional ones (that's a generous term for them) from Facebook or the "perfect" ones on Instagram. You simply don't see people spending 20-30 minutes perfecting their photo or video on Snapchat. And that's why it's awesome. Snapchat is the fast and furious of the social media networks, but in the midst of the chaos, people are telling some fantastic, funny stories. And you are gaining an inside-perspective of people's real lives that doesn't happen elsewhere. So if you're ready to jump into Snapchat or you've just started dabbling, I'm going to talk about how to grow your influence. How to grow your influence on Snapchat I've had a bunch of people asking for themselves or their clients how to engage and grow their following on Snapchat. These tips are for people that want to connect with an audience and grow their influence. While these tips aren't specific for a "business" persona, many of them do apply. 1. Be a user first - AKA learn how to use Snapchat properly It seems like a basic principle, but so many people are trying to leverage social media without understanding the network first. You always make bad decisions when you forget that you need to give more than you take on social. People see right through that. Until you understand what a user values on a social media platform, you will never create content that people love. So you need to first start using Snapchat as a user. Get to know the ins and outs and watch what other people are doing. If you don't know how to use Snapchat, here's a 10-minute tutorial I created to get you started - because, honestly, it's the most-confusing social media platform I've ever seen to get started on. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3jP393HwNs 2. Follow, follow-back After you join, you're going to start to see people following you because you're in their address book (you should also add everyone in your address book to get going - you'll be amazed how many people are already on Snapchat). Follow everyone back that follows you. You don't have to do this for forever, but when you're starting out, you need to see what other people are doing on Snapchat to understand the platform and give you space to interact with them. People appreciate being followed and when you follow them, you get access to watch their public stories. This is invaluable real-world data on how people...

No, you shouldn’t post to Facebook twice a day

Things I hear that make me cringe to no end: "You can post twice a day to Facebook." "We should setup a social media calendar." "You should post X number of times in a month." Part of why they make me cringe is I know they're things that I've said in the past. And maybe that was true in the past. But all of those ideas are incredibly misguided in today's social world. They're missing the point completely and likely utterly destroying your reach on Facebook. (great blog post in there) Here's the proper advice for your Facebook posts: The only time you should post to Facebook is when you have a quality piece of Facebook content to post You probably didn't click the link above so let me re-cap it in a nutshell for you: Facebook does not show your posts to everyone who likes your page - only a percentage Facebook decides that percentage based on how much interaction you get from your posts - Likes, Shares, Comments & Clicks If your content really resonates with your audience and they interact with it, they will increase the percentage If your posting content that you get 1 or 2 Likes on and that's it, they will continue to show it to less and less of the people that like your Page So, let's take some examples of pages I've seen. One company I know posts every single day on Facebook because someone told them they could. They have around 800 Likes on their Facebook page. But their content is just links to other people's articles and no one cares so each of their posts only gets shown to about 40 people and garners maybe 1 or 2 Likes. What a giant waste of both the author and follower's time. Not only is there no interaction, but there's also no brand-building happening. No competitive advantage, creativity, or personality being shown. Let's talk about at another example (again, these are real-life examples - I'm just not going to out them publicly) where a Facebook page posts once a week. The content, though, isn't a sell message, but a piece of content that they've created for their community that's high quality and is based on the best kinds of content for Facebook: Photos with a great sentence or two caption Short video uploaded directly to Facebook (never linked from YouTube or Vimeo) Link to a blog article that they wrote In their case, they also have around 800 Likes on...

If you don’t like Twitter, it’s because you’re doing it wrong

I almost gave up on Twitter a month ago. Almost. I’m so glad I didn’t. Back before images were a thing on Twitter, it was, far and away, my favourite social media platform. How awesome is it that people have to be limited to saying something meaningful in 140 characters. I remember back in the day spending 10-15 minutes crafting tweets that would fit. There was a lot more creativity back then. Of course, marketers got ahold of the platform and started flooding it full of links to sites and then the onslaught of imagery and video followed shortly after. Then the creativity seemed to die. And that’s when I started checking out of Twitter. It just felt way, way too noisy and impossible to get your message out. If that’s you, too, you’ve got Twitter all wrong. The value – especially for business – isn’t about getting a message out. It’s the opportunity to listen to people and have a meaningful interaction. Somewhere along the way, I completely forgot this and got wrapped up in what I wanted to say. But over the last month, I’ve done two key things to restore my faith in Twitter. I unfollowed the really noisy accounts that don’t provide value. I spend 10-15 minutes a day simply looking for tweets from people that I can interact with. By actually putting in a little bit of energy to listen and engage people, it’s amazing how quickly you start making new “friends” here. I recently met someone whose way better at this than me – Tenille Lafontaine AKA @feistyfrugal. We have a mutual friend in @LiseMerle but we had never had an interaction. But she’s always putting out good stuff and I started engaging her on it. What’s incredible is that she has 10’s of 1,000’s of followers and yet she’s always engaging me back. More than that, when I’m putting out tweets, she’s somehow finding my tweets. I’ll tell you. I’m now engaged in what she’s doing and always look for her tweets. And that is how you enjoy and engage people on twitter. Put out great content. Listen. Engage. I think everyone knows this, but few people are actually taking the time to do this. They’re only thinking, “What’s in it for me?”. The sooner you realize life isn’t about you, the happier and more successful you’ll be....

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Vlogging is Reality TV 2.0

If you don’t really “get” vlogs, you’re not alone. But you’re also probably not 8-22 years old. I bet 8 out of 10 people in that demographic follow at least one vlogger on YouTube. My personal addiction is Casey Neistat – a filmmaker from New York. This is him: He’s now put out a 6-10 minute video blog every single day for over year. And in that time, he took his YouTube subscribers from 500,000 to over 2.5 MILLION. He’s got quality content and he’s a character so it works really well. I’ve watched the last 60 or so almost every day – and the ones I miss I just catch up on the next day or two. Vlogs are like reality TV in that you get these inside looks into people’s lives. But what’s way better is the access you get unlike any other reality TV show. Whereas on Big Brother, Teen Mom, or Duck Dynasty, you simply watch these guys on TV, your only chance to interact with them is maybe seeing them at a big fan show somewhere. With good vloggers, they’ve almost always got a ton of interaction points for the people following them to connect – whether that be Q&A, opening stuff that gets sent to them, or actually meeting people in the streets everywhere they go. This ads a whole other layer of connection that regular reality TV can’t touch. The other thing vlogging adds is a real-time element because typically they come out within 24 hours every single day. It means that all the things happening in the world are happening to them at the same time. This makes it way more addictive and easy to engage with. What does this mean for marketers? If you’ve got an interest in the 12-29 demographic, you should be aware of key players like Roman Atwood, Fun For Louis, the aforementioned Casey Neistat and others because there’s a ton of valuable insight into what connects with this hard-to-reach audience. If you’re looking for ways to get a message to this audience, influencer marketing through these vloggers can be huge. If you’re looking to have direct contact with this audience, you may want to start experimenting with these styles of videos to help build a following. I recently started vlogging – I’m up to 20 of them as I write this while working on the 21st. I’ve even done them daily for the past 10 days. It’s a tremendous amount of work. I carry my camera with me everywhere. I...

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Snapchat is Where It’s At

Ok, so this last 12 months I spent a lot of money on camera gear - like way more than I should. And I've put in the time to get better at taking pictures. Heck, people are even paying me to take their photos. That's awesome. Thank you, people! And if you check out my Instagram (plug: @justinreves), you'll see the quality of my pictures is pretty solid. In fact, there's been a big shift these last 12 months with people are stepping up their social media picture game. It's crazy to see tons of "social media celebrities" that just post fantastic-looking pictures of themselves and have tens of thousands of followers . Now there's nothing wrong with that in and of itself, but you know that lots of followers are envying these people's lives and then trying to emulate the same thing on their feeds. And there's this bit of underlying pressure for everyone's lives to look really glamorous when most of ours aren't. It's ok to post a picture of yourself in bad lighting without your makeup done after having been up with 3 kids all night to simply say "being a mom is hard". That's a real-life story! This is why I love Snapchat. Snapchat has no crazy filters or the ability to upload your own fancy photos taken with an expensive camera like I do on Instagram. Snapchat is only about 1-thing - telling raw stories. You can't cover a mediocre story with some top-shelf photos or videos on Snapchat. Rather, when it's done well, Snapchat is full of these real-life, 24-hour stories told in 10-second, low-resolution bytes. For me, I'm still working on my story-telling. Ultimately, the best content coming from people or brands is rich in story and everything else is just icing on the cake. So that's why I've been forcing myself to get into Snapchat. At first it was hard because I didn't understand it and it felt limiting creatively. But now I love it. On Saturday, I had fun telling my story on Snapchat of going to Wal-Mart in sweats covered in spit-up because that was real life for me dealing with 3 kids 3 and under. We shopped together, talked about if "colour-safe bleach" was a real thing, ate some Cobb's bread, and hit up Brewed Awakening for a coffee. None of it was glamorous. But it was a nice change. And it's got me thinking about this: If you can tell good stories without all the fancy equipment and filters, think how much better you'll be if you do add that layer. Are you telling stories...

On Your Facebook Page, Posting Nothing is Better than Posting Something

You likely already know this, but Facebook does not show your Page's posts to everyone who likes the page. If they showed every post to every fan of every page, our Facebook feeds would be 90% business junk and very few posts from our friends (although when there's an election close, that maybe wouldn't be a bad thing). Facebook decides to show posts from your page to a select few that like your page. What's important to know is that Facebook shows your posts to more of your fans if you consistently put out good content or, on the opposite side, will show it to a much smaller percentage of your fans if you aren't consistently putting out good content. How does it know? Likes, Comments, Clicks, and Shares. And why does this matter? Because posts that don't engage your audience mean that when you do have a good post, it will get shown to fewer of your fans. So you may think that you're helping yourself by at least putting something out there as opposed to nothing, but if you notice that your content isn't generating those Likes, Comments, Clicks, or Shares, you should stop what you're doing. You're lessening your chance to naturally reach your audience with every post. Sure, you can force your content on people by using that Boost button and paying for it, but if you need a 1,000 paid views to generate a couple of Likes, I'd venture a guess that the content you're putting out there really isn't effective. Your audience has given you a huge gift in their permission for you to reach out to them. Don't take this privilege lightly. It's a fantastic opportunity for your business to connect with people without them having to step foot in your store or visit your website. Businesses before social media rarely had this opportunity without paying. Example Time I manage the social media for the church I attend. That may seem very different than a business, but it's still a large group of consumers that I've seen only interact with good content. In fact, in some ways, getting shares or likes can be more of a challenge because it's actually a lot more socially-acceptable to share a Tasty video or Super Bowl half-time show than something from your church (obviously, like every cause or political group, there are the select few that can't share enough stuff from obscure blogs). But it's still a fantastic, engaged community - but I make sure...